Types of process validation

1. Types of process validation

.Depending on when it is performed in relation to production, validation can be prospective, concurrent, retrospective or revalidation (repeated validation).

Prospective validation is carried out during the development stage by means of a risk analysis of the production process, which is broken down into individual steps: these are then evaluated on the basis of past experience to determine whether they might lead to critical situations.

Where possible critical situations are identified, the risk is evaluated, the potential causes are investigated and assessed for probability and extent, the trial plans are drawn up, and the priorities set. The trials are then performed and evaluated, and an overall assessment is made. If, at the end, the results are acceptable, the process is satisfactory. Unsatisfactory processes must be modified and improved until a validation exercise proves them to be satisfactory. This form of validation is essential in order to limit the risk of errors occurring on the production scale, e.g. in the preparation of injectable products.

Concurrent validation is carried out during normal production. This method is effective only if the development stage has resulted in a proper understanding of the fundamentals of the process. The first three production-scale batches must be monitored as comprehensively as possible.1The nature and specifications of subsequent in-process and final tests are based on the evaluation of the results of such monitoring.

1 This careful monitoring of the first three production batches is sometimes regarded as prospective validation.


Concurrent validation together with a trend analysis including stability should be carried out to an appropriate extent throughout the life of the product.

Retrospective validation involves the examination of past experience of production on the assumption that composition, procedures, and equipment remain unchanged; such experience and the results of in-process and final control tests are then evaluated. Recorded difficulties and failures in production are analysed to determine the limits of process parameters. A trend analysis may be conducted to determine the extent to which the process parameters are within the permissible range.

Retrospective validation is obviously not a quality assurance measure in itself, and should never be applied to new processes or products. It may be considered in special circumstances only, e.g. when validation requirements are first introduced in a company. Retrospective validation may then be useful in establishing the priorities for the validation programme. If the results of a retrospective validation are positive, this indicates that the process is not in need of immediate attention and may be validated in accordance with the normal schedule. For tablets which have been compressed under individual pressure-sensitive cells, and with qualified equipment, retrospective validation is the most comprehensive test of the overall manufacturing process of this dosage form. On the other hand, it should not be applied in the manufacture of sterile products.

Revalidation is needed to ensure that changes in the process and/or in the process environment, whether intentional or unintentional, do not adversely affect process characteristics and product quality.

Revalidation may be divided into two broad categories:

• Revalidation after any change having a bearing on product quality.
• Periodic revalidation carried out at scheduled intervals.


Revalidation after changes. Revalidation must be performed on introduction of any changes affecting a manufacturing and/or standard procedure having a bearing on the established product performance characteristics. Such changes may include those in starting material, packaging material, manufacturing processes, equipment, in-process controls, manufacturing areas, or support systems (water, steam, etc.). Every such change requested should be reviewed by a qualified validation group, which will decide whether it is significant enough to justify revalidation and, if so, its extent.

Revalidation after changes may be based on the performance of the same tests and activities as those used during the original validation, including tests on subprocesses and on the equipment concerned. Some typical changes which require revalidation include the following:

• Changes in the starting material(s). Changes in the physical properties, such as density, viscosity, particle size distribution, and crystal type and modification, of the active ingredients or excipients may affect the mechanical properties of the material; as a consequence, they may adversely affect the process or the product.

• Changes in the packaging material, e.g. replacing plastics by glass, may require changes in the packaging procedure and therefore affect product stability.

• Changes in the process, e.g. changes in mixing time, drying temperature and cooling regime, may affect subsequent process steps and product quality.

• Changes in equipment, including measuring instruments, may affect both the process and the product; repair and maintenance work, such as the replacement of major equipment components, may affect the process.

• Changes in the production area and support system, e.g. the rearrangement of manufacturing areas and/or support systems, may result in changes in the process. The repair and maintenance of support systems, such as ventilation, may change the environmental conditions and, as a consequence, revalidation/requalification may be necessary, mainly in the manufacture of sterile products.

• Unexpected changes and deviations may be observed during self-inspection or audit, or during the continuous trend analysis of process data.


Periodic revalidation. It is well known that process changes may occur gradually even if experienced operators work correctly according to established methods. Similarly, equipment wear may also cause gradual changes. Consequently, revalidation at scheduled times is advisable even if no changes have been deliberately made.

The decision to introduce periodic revalidation should be based essentially on a review of historical data, i.e. data generated during in-process and finished product testing after the latest validation, aimed at verifying that the process is under control. During the review of such historical data, any trend in the data collected should be evaluated.

In some processes, such as sterilization, additional process testing is required to complement the historical data. The degree of testing required will be apparent from the original validation.

Additionally, the following points should be checked at the time of a scheduled revalidation:

• Have any changes in master formula and methods, batch size, etc., occurred? If so, has their impact on the product been assessed?

• Have calibrations been made in accordance with the established programme and time schedule?

• Has preventive maintenance been performed in accordance with the programme and time schedule?

• Have the standard operating procedures (SOPs) been properly updated?

• Have the SOPs been implemented?

• Have the cleaning and hygiene programmes been carried out?

• Have any changes been made in the analytical control methods?

2. Prerequisites for process validation

Before process validation can be started, manufacturing equipment and control instruments, as well as the formulation, must be qualified. The formulation of a pharmaceutical product should be studied in detail and qualified at the development stage, i.e. before the application for the marketing authorization is submitted. This involves preformulation studies, studies on the compatibility of active ingredients and excipients, and of final drug product and packaging material, stability studies, etc.

Other aspects of manufacture must be validated, including critical services (water, air, nitrogen, power supply, etc.), and supporting operations, such as equipment cleaning and sanitation of premises. Proper training and motivation of personnel are prerequisites to successful validation.

18 comments:

George said...

I agree that validation processes can appear on various stages of production. Validation is usually done to make sure that there is consistency in output quality. Calibrating mechanisms like near infrared technology effectively measure minute components, like granules, to determine any change in their qualities. The prominence of
near infrared devices in the production phase is a response to higher standards in product development.


Very extensive discussion. Thanks!

Sean said...

In addition to what George has stated, process validation is definitely vital especially for large production runs. This is to standardize all processes. Process validation is also where new technologies can be integrated.

bablu said...

Thanks for the info

shivraj said...

But what is difference betwwen prospective and concurrent validation. Are they same.

shivraj said...

what is diffeence between prospective and concurrent validation are they same.

AMOL PATIL said...

Amol Patil- Provided very good information and actual differences between various types of validation process.
but from the shivraj point of view you should differentiate both type by over simplifying the concept soo no one have any doubt in there mind.
Thanks ...............

Sitaram Metangale said...

what is the diffrence between prospective validation and concurrent validation

Sitaram Metangale said...

pls give us briefly cleaning validation and having all respective terms

Philip Smith said...

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Pharmacy Trader

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Thakur Sachin chauhan said...

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sandip said...

Concurrent validation is used for establishing documented evidence that a facility and processes do what they purport to do, based on information generated during actual imputation of the process. This approach involves monitoring of critical processing steps and end product testing of current production, to show that the manufacturing process is in a state of control.
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Bikram ku das said...

Retrospective validation is obviously not a quality assurance measure in itself, and should never be applied to new processes or products. It may be considered in special circumstances only, e.g. when validation requirements are first introduced in a company. Retrospective validation may then be useful in establishing the priorities for the validation programme. If the results of a retrospective validation are positive, this indicates that the process is not in need of immediate attention and may be validated in accordance with the normal schedule. For tablets which have been compressed under individual pressure-sensitive cells, and with qualified equipment, retrospective validation is the most comprehensive test of the overall manufacturing process of this dosage form. On the other hand, it should not be applied in the manufacture of sterile products.more information

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